Pest Control For Realtors: Different Effective Pest Control Techniques To Use In Buildings

byAlma Abell

With the booming business of buying and selling commercial and residential buildings, the dealers or realtors are keen on ensuring that there are no pests in the buildings they are selling. The presence of pests in a house can easily put off the client’s desire to buy the house. The house brokers or realtors, therefore, ensure that they use professional pest control methods to get rid of raccoons, rats, spiders, mice, possums and other annoying pests from the houses they intend to sell. A few techniques of the Pest Control for Realtors include:

  • Article chemical sprays: The chemicals will effectively kill the target pests in the buildings once you apply them in strategic places both in the building and around the yard. Professional exterminators know the sprays that effectively kill the burrowing and gnawing pests. Chemical sprays use kill pest instantly and have no harmful health side effects to the family members who live in the building and to the environment as well.
  • Technological traps: Many people do not understand why the traps take long or even fail to trap the target pests while the traps catch target pests within a few hours. Professional exterminators know the right trap settings to use and the best way to dispose of the trapped pests like rats. If the traps just only hurt the pests, it will be hard for other pests to come near the traps due to the blood scent they detect. However, the professionals will dispose of the pests in the right way and clean the trap uniquely to attract other pests.
  • Shoot the pests: Professional pest control experts can decide to use snipers to kill the annoying larger pests in your building. Before the experts choose to use the guns that shoot pests, they will first consider the gun regulations and laws in your area. If there are no such ordinance, they will use Pest Control for Realtors to eliminate pests in your house within a few hours without harming the environment.

The best way to eliminate pests in your houses for sale is by hiring exterminators with incomparable experience and solid reputation. Look for experts use effective pest control products that are healthy and environment-friendly. Visit to contact such exterminators.

No Comments | Filed under Property Management

Saudi Arabia plans to open embassy in Finland

Saudi Arabia plans to open embassy in Finland

Saturday, October 20, 2007

It has been announced that Saudi Arabia is planning to open an official embassy in Finland, to signify continuing improvement in relations between the two countries.

Teemu Tanner, director general of Africa and the Middle East at the Ministry for Foreign Affairs of Finland, said to reporters concerning Finnish President Tarja Halonen’s first visit to Saudi Arabia on Sunday, “One indication of this visit is that you (Saudi Arabia) are planning to open an embassy here in Helsinki,” adding that “We regard this as extremely important for relations,” and that it is only a matter of time before the facility is made available.

Another act set to strengthen diplomatic relations is the planned visit of a trade delegation headed by Saudi Minister of Trade and Commerce Hashim Yamani, which will arrive in Finland next month.

“Our relationship is no longer in relation to trade,” said Tanner. “More broadly, we will discuss regional and global issues. It is extremely important for us to know Saudi Arabia’s views on Iraq, Iran, but also issues such as Somalia… One objective of the visit is to convey notes on international questions, as we enter a very interesting phase in the Middle East peace process,” adding that the presidential visit is a relational “landmark” that will “crystallize” Finland’s image to Saudi Arabia.

Despite the comment that the international cooperation is no longer entirely a trade issue, he did point out Saudi Arabia’s important role in the Finnish economy as one of the five largest importers of Finnish products. Finland’s main exports to Saudi Arabia are mobile phones, paper, wood and machinery, while Saudi Arabia exports large quantities of raw materials for use in manufacturing plastics. The total volume if this trade is estimated to be worth over €840 million.

Other topics on the table for the two nations to discuss during Halonen’s visit include energy, the role of science, environmental issues and combating terrorism, as well as other global issues. Tanner has also suggested tourism may be a future area of attention, with a possibility of package holidays for Finnish tourists being organized to Saudi Arabia.

Finland and Saudi Arabia have been officially involved in diplomatic relations since 1969. Finland has maintained an embassy in Saudi Arabia since 1974.

No Comments | Filed under Uncategorized



This is the category for music. See also the Music Portal.

Refresh this list to see the latest articles.

  • 9 February 2018: Poet, lyricist, and digital activist John Perry Barlow dies, aged 70
  • 18 January 2018: Irish rock band The Cranberries’ lead singer Dolores O’Riordan dies at 46
  • 13 December 2017: Apple, Inc. confirms acquisition of Shazam
  • 24 October 2017: Five United States ex-presidents raise relief funds at hurricane event
  • 5 October 2017: US rock artist Tom Petty dies at 66
  • 30 July 2017: British dancer and talent show winner Robert Anker dies in car accident aged 27
  • 25 July 2017: Linkin Park’s lead singer Chester Bennington dies at 41
  • 5 June 2017: Conductor Jeffrey Tate dies aged 74
  • 27 May 2017: British counterterrorism agents say many of Manchester arena suicide bomber’s confederates in custody
  • 15 May 2017: Salvador Sobral wins Eurovision for Portugal

You can also browse through all articles in this category alphabetically.

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write.

Sister projects
  • Wikibooks
  • Commons
  • Wikipedia
  • Wikiquote
  • Wikisource
  • Wiktionary
  • Wikiversity
  • Wikivoyage


Pages in category “Music”

(previous page) ()(previous page) ()

Media in category “Music”

No Comments | Filed under Uncategorized

Light Switch Plate An Easy Way To Brighten A Room

By Jesse Akre

Take a look at that light switch plate by the doorway. Have you ever considered how it feels? It’s sitting there, on the wall, relatively ignored. It’s not the light switch plate’s fault. You haven’t even given it a chance, since it’s just a boring, plain piece of plastic.

That light switch plate looks around the room and sees the love you gave to the rest of this space. The walls were given a coat of paint to make them prettier. You may even have gone all out and added borders or wallpaper to really dress it up. The floor was given rugs and other accents to make it look nicer. The door even got a glass door knob and looks great. But, then there’s the light switch plate, plain white plastic, and unloved.

It’s time to give your light switch plate what it’s been begging for, a little love and attention.

While you could just go to the store and pick up a ready-made decorative light switch plate, why wouldn’t you want to show that long-neglected light switch plate that you really care for it and want to give it a new life.

YouTube Preview Image

Making your own decorative light switch plate can also be a fun project.

First, you need to decide what you want on your light switch plate. One of the options are to cover it with dried flowers. Another option is to paint it yourself. Still another possibility is that you could use wallpaper, or other accent paper, to make your light switch plate match the rest of your room.

For all of these projects, you will need a few basic elements. Glue, paint, items you plan on attaching to the light switch plate and a water-proof sealer.

Painting – If you are going to paint your light switch plate as a piece of art, to add to the room, pull out the brushes and get to work. Once the paint has completely dried you can either finish the project or add to it. If you want to add a few touches, you can glue items to the top of your creation. Once it is all dried, make sure to use the water-proof sealer to protect it.

Covering – Using cloth or paper to cover a light switch plate is a project of precision. It may take a lot of little cuts and careful placement to get a smooth coverage of the cloth or paper. Make sure to glue it in place and once it dries, cover the whole creation with a water-proof sealer.

Decorating – If you like texture in your creations, add some to your light switch plate. From flowers to stickers, pictures, glitter and other items you think will make a fun addition to a light switch plate, glue them in place. Once the glue has dried and everything is where you want it, make sure to protect it with a water-proof sealer.

You may have noticed all these light switch plate decorating ideas end with a sealer. The reason for this is not only will it help your creation hold together better over time, but it will also make them easier to clean when grimy hands miss the switch but gunk up the light switch plate.

About the Author: Jesse Akre,author and owner of numerous home decor sites, offers online consumers his thoughts on purchasing indoor accessories such as decorative

switchplate covers

, brightly hued

switch plates

and an elegantly embellished

light switch plate



Permanent Link:

No Comments | Filed under Kitchen Home Improvement

Toyota accused of misleading public over recalls

Toyota accused of misleading public over recalls

Tuesday, February 23, 2010

Toyota has been accused by a U.S. House of Representatives committee with misleading the public and investigators over its recent recalls.

The accusations, in a statement from the House Energy and Commerce Committee, claim that Toyota both relied on a flawed study in its assessment of the issue of sticking accelerator pedals at the heart of the recalls, and then made misleading statements about its response. According to the authors of the letter, Henry Waxman and Bart Stupak, Toyota dismissed, rather than investigated, the idea that the cars’ computers were at fault. In a statement, James Lentz, the president of Toyota’s American division, claimed that hardware issues were to blame, and that dealers were repairing the faulty part. Toyota also released a study commissioned from the research firm Exponent that said electronic systems were not to blame.

According to the House committee, however, the study involved only six vehicles, none of which had problems with their electrical systems, and was insufficient to produce an accurate result. “Our preliminary assessment is that Toyota resisted the possibility that electronic defects could cause safety concerns, relied on a flawed engineering report and made misleading public statements concerning the adequacy of recent recalls to address the risk of sudden unintended acceleration.”

The company is under a criminal investigation, and has received two subpoenas for documents from two House committees relating to the recalls, although whether they are directly related to the letter is unclear. The documents are related to accelerator issues in several models, as well as brake problems with the Prius hybrid car, and were served earlier in in February by a federal grand jury and the Securities and Exchange Commission. Toyota has released upwards of 75,000 pages of documents under the requests.

In a separate, though related, development, it has emerged that Toyota last year negotiated a limited recall for two models, the Toyota Camry and Lexus ES, that were affected by the accelerator recalls, saving the company an estimated $100 million. A confidential internal presentation in July 2009 made the claim, and a month later, a Lexus ES, one of the models under the limited recall crashed in California, killing four people. The claims apparently referenced a September, 2007 recall of floor mats that could trap gas pedals, the same problem that triggered a full recall of numerous Toyota cars to fix the same problem. In the same presentation, the company claimed to have avoided recalls of another model related to rust, as well as delaying new federal safety regulations.

Posted: March 19th, 2018 by

No Comments | Filed under Uncategorized

Scientists take strong stance for cutting emissions at Climate Conference in Bali

Scientists take strong stance for cutting emissions at Climate Conference in Bali

Thursday, December 6, 2007

A group of over 200 scientists have signed a document demanding that political action be taken following the scientific evidence that had been put forth in the last International report on climate change. The document, that had been drafted by the Climate Change Research Centre at the University of New South Wales in Australia, was presented today at the United Nations Convention on Climate change, the scientists wanting to give a strong signal to the currently ongoing negotiations.

Unlike the International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), which tries to assess the current situation and what the future trends are, the 2007 Bali Climate Declaration by Scientists makes explicit recommendations to policy makers. These are twofold, one regarding the current Conference, and one future goals. On the talks here at Bali, the Declaration says it is necessary that “a new global climate treaty […] needs to begin in December 2007 and be completed by 2009”. It went on to say that “The primary goal of this new regime must be to limit global warming to no more than 2 °C”, and that emissions would need to be cut to 40% or less than 2004 levels in order to be able to reach that goal.

Asked by which means these reductions could be achieved, Professor Richard Somerville from the United States answered that only a combination of technological advances and lifestyle changes would be sufficient to attain the proposed emission levels.

The declaration, which is only about a page long, and its signatory list can be found at the Climate Change Research Centre’s website (see below).

Posted: March 18th, 2018 by

No Comments | Filed under Uncategorized

How To Create An Outdoor Oasis In Your Backyard}

Submitted by: Don Jacobson

Most of us are in awe of some of the landscaping we see when we travel. We can create that type of ambiance in our own backyards. Magazines and do it yourself shows are giving us the knowledge we need to transform a simple crabgrass filled backyard to an outdoor oasis.

You just need to do some planning and budgeting first and foremost. It wouldnt hurt to draw a rough draft of your plans. It does not have to be perfect sketches; simple shapes will suffice. Sketching your plans in color will help you distinguish your plants and flowers.

If the budget allows, and you dont feel confident enough to do it yourself, hire an expert; however, be proactive so that you will have some ownership in your project. You can at least tell your friends you selected the perfect spot for your sunflowers.

Once youve selected your perennials, plants that bloom annually and biannually, you can select you annuals. Your annuals usually die off after one blooming season. They are interchangeable from one season to the next. Some annuals may be transferred to the house in winter if they are still growing in the fall.

YouTube Preview Image

Fruit trees are a popular addition to a backyard oasis. The fragrance of the flowers and fruit awakens the senses. You will have to consider where you live in making your tree selection just like your flower selections. The position of the trees will be of utmost important. Away from the house would be ideal.

Backyard ornaments or statues make great accents to your oasis. A trellis will work well for climbing plants like roses. Koi ponds are also popular. Many people are doing it themselves. A short wooden bridge could lead to another beautiful part of your oasis. A fountain is a must for that tranquility and sedation we all need to take relaxation to the proper level. Then there is the lighting element.

Solar spikes are what people are using to light the ground these days. A string of lighting, lanterns and/or torch lighting makes everyone look attractive. There are so many types of fire pits available these days; you can be creative with your choices including making your own. Then theres seating.

I suggest that you make 2-4 different seating areas, depending on the size of your back yard. It gives 2 or more people the opportunity to hold different conversations. It also gives the homeowner a variety of spots to enjoy. A couple of Adirondack chairs and matching table in on area, a swing in another, and an umbrella table and chair set in yet another area. If there are a couple of mature trees in the yard, a hammock may serve you well here. Make the space your own and it is instantly an oasis.

Once youve planted your favorite flowers, trees and plants and youve outfitted your oasis with Adirondack chairs, and or loveseats, youve cut on the fountain, and the lights youre ready to turn on some soft music, prepare your favorite beverage and reach for nirvana. Thats the way I see it, now how about capturing your own vision

About the Author: To Find more about

adirondack chairs


adirondack chairs

. Website provides info about

patio chairs


chaise lounge



Permanent Link:}

Posted: March 18th, 2018 by

No Comments | Filed under Bean Bags

European Union to fund scheme to reduce aircraft emissions and noise pollution

European Union to fund scheme to reduce aircraft emissions and noise pollution

Wednesday, June 13, 2007

The European Union (EU) has announced plans to fund a private-public scheme dubbed “Clean Sky” to reduce aircraft emissions and noise pollution in European aircraft. Officials claim that the project will have large-scale economic benefits, will reduce jet engine carbon emissions by 20 to 40 percent and will therefore offset the large growth in commercial air travel. The proposal comes at a time when European officials are under heavy criticism for not doing enough to reduce aircraft emissions.

The new proposal is outlined in a document that is reported to be likely to be passed by the European Commission. The document says that “Not launching Clean Sky soon will put the European industry in a position of competitive disadvantage, with negative repercussions not only for the industry itself but also for the EU as a whole,” and goes on to point out that the US has a comparable scheme, the National Aeronautics Research and Development Policy, and points out that progress is beginning to be made in the area by Brazil, Russia, China and India. The paper also highlights the need for public spending in the scheme to ensure it does not fall behind international development. The commission has argued that “the present value, at 2006 prices, of the cumulative direct effect over the period 2010-2035 of Clean Sky on economic output in the EU has been estimated to approximately €100 billion to €160 billion reflecting increased operating profits, labor expenditures, capital investment and other direct effects.”

The proposal calls for the aviation industry to contribute €800 million between 2008 and 2014, with companies such as Airbus, Rolls-Royce, Saab, Thales, Dassault and Eurocopter. Universities and research institutions have also pledged support. The funding will be matched with public money from the EU, making the total cost €1.6 billion.

As well as approval by the European Commission, the plan requires approval by the individual EU member states. Britain, though infamously skeptical of large EU projects, has already voiced its support, along with several other countries.

If the project goes ahead, funding will be split between six separate main initiatives, including a “greener” engine, a “smart” fixed wing that continually readjusts itself to maintain best fuel economy, and research regarding lighter materials that could be used to replace metals in aircraft bodies and components.

According to current estimates, the 20 to 40 percent carbon emissions reduction will mean a reduction of two to three billion tons between 2015 and 2050, and the project will also reduce nitrogen oxide emissions by 40 to 60 percent in the same time frame, as well as causing a 50 percent reduction in “perceived aircraft noise.”

Posted: March 18th, 2018 by

No Comments | Filed under Uncategorized

G20 protests: Inside a labour march

G20 protests: Inside a labour march
Wikinews accredited reporter Killing Vector traveled to the G-20 2009 summit protests in London with a group of protesters. This is his personal account.

Friday, April 3, 2009

London – “Protest”, says Ross Saunders, “is basically theatre”.

It’s seven a.m. and I’m on a mini-bus heading east on the M4 motorway from Cardiff toward London. I’m riding with seventeen members of the Cardiff Socialist Party, of which Saunders is branch secretary for the Cardiff West branch; they’re going to participate in a march that’s part of the protests against the G-20 meeting.

Before we boarded the minibus Saunders made a speech outlining the reasons for the march. He said they were “fighting for jobs for young people, fighting for free education, fighting for our share of the wealth, which we create.” His anger is directed at the government’s response to the economic downturn: “Now that the recession is underway, they’ve been trying to shoulder more of the burden onto the people, and onto the young people…they’re expecting us to pay for it.” He compared the protest to the Jarrow March and to the miners’ strikes which were hugely influential in the history of the British labour movement. The people assembled, though, aren’t miners or industrial workers — they’re university students or recent graduates, and the march they’re going to participate in is the Youth Fight For Jobs.

The Socialist Party was formerly part of the Labour Party, which has ruled the United Kingdom since 1997 and remains a member of the Socialist International. On the bus, Saunders and some of his cohorts — they occasionally, especially the older members, address each other as “comrade” — explains their view on how the split with Labour came about. As the Third Way became the dominant voice in the Labour Party, culminating with the replacement of Neil Kinnock with Tony Blair as party leader, the Socialist cadre became increasingly disaffected. “There used to be democratic structures, political meetings” within the party, they say. The branch meetings still exist but “now, they passed a resolution calling for renationalisation of the railways, and they [the party leadership] just ignored it.” They claim that the disaffection with New Labour has caused the party to lose “half its membership” and that people are seeking alternatives. Since the economic crisis began, Cardiff West’s membership has doubled, to 25 members, and the RMT has organized itself as a political movement running candidates in the 2009 EU Parliament election. The right-wing British National Party or BNP is making gains as well, though.

Talk on the bus is mostly political and the news of yesterday’s violence at the G-20 demonstrations, where a bank was stormed by protesters and 87 were arrested, is thick in the air. One member comments on the invasion of a RBS building in which phone lines were cut and furniture was destroyed: “It’s not very constructive but it does make you smile.” Another, reading about developments at the conference which have set France and Germany opposing the UK and the United States, says sardonically, “we’re going to stop all the squabbles — they’re going to unite against us. That’s what happens.” She recounts how, in her native Sweden during the Second World War, a national unity government was formed among all major parties, and Swedish communists were interned in camps, while Nazi-leaning parties were left unmolested.

In London around 11am the march assembles on Camberwell Green. About 250 people are here, from many parts of Britain; I meet marchers from Newcastle, Manchester, Leicester, and especially organized-labor stronghold Sheffield. The sky is grey but the atmosphere is convivial; five members of London’s Metropolitan Police are present, and they’re all smiling. Most marchers are young, some as young as high school age, but a few are older; some teachers, including members of the Lewisham and Sheffield chapters of the National Union of Teachers, are carrying banners in support of their students.

Gordon Brown’s a Tory/He wears a Tory hat/And when he saw our uni fees/He said ‘I’ll double that!’

Stewards hand out sheets of paper with the words to call-and-response chants on them. Some are youth-oriented and education-oriented, like the jaunty “Gordon Brown‘s a Tory/He wears a Tory hat/And when he saw our uni fees/He said ‘I’ll double that!'” (sung to the tune of the Lonnie Donegan song “My Old Man’s a Dustman“); but many are standbys of organized labour, including the infamous “workers of the world, unite!“. It also outlines the goals of the protest, as “demands”: “The right to a decent job for all, with a living wage of at least £8 and hour. No to cheap labour apprenticeships! for all apprenticeships to pay at least the minimum wage, with a job guaranteed at the end. No to university fees. support the campaign to defeat fees.” Another steward with a megaphone and a bright red t-shirt talks the assembled protesters through the basics of call-and-response chanting.

Finally the march gets underway, traveling through the London boroughs of Camberwell and Southwark. Along the route of the march more police follow along, escorting and guiding the march and watching it carefully, while a police van with flashing lights clears the route in front of it. On the surface the atmosphere is enthusiastic, but everyone freezes for a second as a siren is heard behind them; it turns out to be a passing ambulance.

Crossing Southwark Bridge, the march enters the City of London, the comparably small but dense area containing London’s financial and economic heart. Although one recipient of the protesters’ anger is the Bank of England, the march does not stop in the City, only passing through the streets by the London Exchange. Tourists on buses and businessmen in pinstripe suits record snippets of the march on their mobile phones as it passes them; as it goes past a branch of HSBC the employees gather at the glass store front and watch nervously. The time in the City is brief; rather than continue into the very centre of London the march turns east and, passing the Tower of London, proceeds into the poor, largely immigrant neighbourhoods of the Tower Hamlets.

The sun has come out, and the spirits of the protesters have remained high. But few people, only occasional faces at windows in the blocks of apartments, are here to see the march and it is in Wapping High Street that I hear my first complaint from the marchers. Peter, a steward, complains that the police have taken the march off its original route and onto back streets where “there’s nobody to protest to”. I ask how he feels about the possibility of violence, noting the incidents the day before, and he replies that it was “justified aggression”. “We don’t condone it but people have only got certain limitations.”

There’s nobody to protest to!

A policeman I ask is very polite but noncommittal about the change in route. “The students are getting the message out”, he says, so there’s no problem. “Everyone’s very well behaved” in his assessment and the atmosphere is “very positive”. Another protestor, a sign-carrying university student from Sheffield, half-heartedly returns the compliment: today, she says, “the police have been surprisingly unridiculous.”

The march pauses just before it enters Cable Street. Here, in 1936, was the site of the Battle of Cable Street, and the march leader, addressing the protesters through her megaphone, marks the moment. She draws a parallel between the British Union of Fascists of the 1930s and the much smaller BNP today, and as the protesters follow the East London street their chant becomes “The BNP tell racist lies/We fight back and organise!”

In Victoria Park — “The People’s Park” as it was sometimes known — the march stops for lunch. The trade unions of East London have organized and paid for a lunch of hamburgers, hot dogs, french fries and tea, and, picnic-style, the marchers enjoy their meals as organized labor veterans give brief speeches about industrial actions from a small raised platform.

A demonstration is always a means to and end.

During the rally I have the opportunity to speak with Neil Cafferky, a Galway-born Londoner and the London organizer of the Youth Fight For Jobs march. I ask him first about why, despite being surrounded by red banners and quotes from Karl Marx, I haven’t once heard the word “communism” used all day. He explains that, while he considers himself a Marxist and a Trotskyist, the word communism has negative connotations that would “act as a barrier” to getting people involved: the Socialist Party wants to avoid the discussion of its position on the USSR and disassociate itself from Stalinism. What the Socialists favor, he says, is “democratic planned production” with “the working class, the youths brought into the heart of decision making.”

On the subject of the police’s re-routing of the march, he says the new route is actually the synthesis of two proposals. Originally the march was to have gone from Camberwell Green to the Houses of Parliament, then across the sites of the 2012 Olympics and finally to the ExCel Centre. The police, meanwhile, wanted there to be no march at all.

The Metropolitan Police had argued that, with only 650 trained traffic officers on the force and most of those providing security at the ExCel Centre itself, there simply wasn’t the manpower available to close main streets, so a route along back streets was necessary if the march was to go ahead at all. Cafferky is sceptical of the police explanation. “It’s all very well having concern for health and safety,” he responds. “Our concern is using planning to block protest.”

He accuses the police and the government of having used legal, bureaucratic and even violent means to block protests. Talking about marches having to defend themselves, he says “if the police set out with the intention of assaulting marches then violence is unavoidable.” He says the police have been known to insert “provocateurs” into marches, which have to be isolated. He also asserts the right of marches to defend themselves when attacked, although this “must be done in a disciplined manner”.

He says he wasn’t present at yesterday’s demonstrations and so can’t comment on the accusations of violence against police. But, he says, there is often provocative behavior on both sides. Rather than reject violence outright, Cafferky argues that there needs to be “clear political understanding of the role of violence” and calls it “counter-productive”.

Demonstration overall, though, he says, is always a useful tool, although “a demonstration is always a means to an end” rather than an end in itself. He mentions other ongoing industrial actions such as the occupation of the Visteon plant in Enfield; 200 fired workers at the factory have been occupying the plant since April 1, and states the solidarity between the youth marchers and the industrial workers.

I also speak briefly with members of the International Bolshevik Tendency, a small group of left-wing activists who have brought some signs to the rally. The Bolsheviks say that, like the Socialists, they’re Trotskyists, but have differences with them on the idea of organization; the International Bolshevik Tendency believes that control of the party representing the working class should be less democratic and instead be in the hands of a team of experts in history and politics. Relations between the two groups are “chilly”, says one.

At 2:30 the march resumes. Rather than proceeding to the ExCel Centre itself, though, it makes its way to a station of London’s Docklands Light Railway; on the way, several of East London’s school-aged youths join the march, and on reaching Canning Town the group is some 300 strong. Proceeding on foot through the borough, the Youth Fight For Jobs reaches the protest site outside the G-20 meeting.

It’s impossible to legally get too close to the conference itself. Police are guarding every approach, and have formed a double cordon between the protest area and the route that motorcades take into and out of the conference venue. Most are un-armed, in the tradition of London police; only a few even carry truncheons. Closer to the building, though, a few machine gun-armed riot police are present, standing out sharply in their black uniforms against the high-visibility yellow vests of the Metropolitan Police. The G-20 conference itself, which started a few hours before the march began, is already winding down, and about a thousand protesters are present.

I see three large groups: the Youth Fight For Jobs avoids going into the center of the protest area, instead staying in their own group at the admonition of the stewards and listening to a series of guest speakers who tell them about current industrial actions and the organization of the Youth Fight’s upcoming rally at UCL. A second group carries the Ogaden National Liberation Front‘s flag and is campaigning for recognition of an autonomous homeland in eastern Ethiopia. Others protesting the Ethiopian government make up the third group; waving old Ethiopian flags, including the Lion of Judah standard of emperor Haile Selassie, they demand that foreign aid to Ethiopia be tied to democratization in that country: “No recovery without democracy”.

A set of abandoned signs tied to bollards indicate that the CND has been here, but has already gone home; they were demanding the abandonment of nuclear weapons. But apart from a handful of individuals with handmade, cardboard signs I see no groups addressing the G-20 meeting itself, other than the Youth Fight For Jobs’ slogans concerning the bailout. But when a motorcade passes, catcalls and jeers are heard.

It’s now 5pm and, after four hours of driving, five hours marching and one hour at the G-20, Cardiff’s Socialists are returning home. I board the bus with them and, navigating slowly through the snarled London traffic, we listen to BBC Radio 4. The news is reporting on the closure of the G-20 conference; while they take time out to mention that Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper delayed the traditional group photograph of the G-20’s world leaders because “he was on the loo“, no mention is made of today’s protests. Those listening in the bus are disappointed by the lack of coverage.

Most people on the return trip are tired. Many sleep. Others read the latest issue of The Socialist, the Socialist Party’s newspaper. Mia quietly sings “The Internationale” in Swedish.

Due to the traffic, the journey back to Cardiff will be even longer than the journey to London. Over the objections of a few of its members, the South Welsh participants in the Youth Fight For Jobs stop at a McDonald’s before returning to the M4 and home.

Posted: March 17th, 2018 by

No Comments | Filed under Uncategorized

Is It Time To Electronically File Your Income Tax Returns In Canada

By Thor Hanso

The old saying goes that two things in life are certain: death and taxes. Although this is true taxes don’t have to be quite as painful as it was 15 years ago. Prior to the internet and personal computers for everyone filing your taxes was a terrible affair that required either an accountant or plenty of time. However, with the introduction of the internet filing your taxes is much easier than before.

However and quite surprisingly, is that not everyone in Canada files their taxes online. In fact, according to CBC in 2009 only 56% of tax returns were filed online. This means that 44% of the people are either using the old-cumbersome method of paper or using the automated telephone method, Telefile. Here is the breakdown of various tax-filing methods.

Paper – 11.29 Miillion returns (42.4%)

Netfile – 4.63 Million returns (17.4%) – The system that individuals use when filing their taxes through software applications like TurboTax, Ufile, etc

YouTube Preview Image

EFile – 10.24 Million returns (38.5%) – The system that tax professionals use to file other people’s taxes.

Telefile – 445,067 returns (1.7%) – An automated system used for VERY simple tax returns.

In this computer aided world where the internet, computers and various tax processing software making things easier it’s hard to see people filing their taxes with paper. However, over 11 million people filed their taxes with paper in 2009! The need for a paper version is fairly clear, however, for anyone with a slightly complex tax return the increased value in using a computer aided version must outweigh the costs of the software!

In fact, it would be interesting to know if people filing their taxes with paper missed out on money (ie: deductions) that they didn’t know existed. Did they get their full RRSP deduction, tuition transferred, investment income, etc Is it was worth saving the money for the tax-software? In addition, filing your taxes online provides a much quicker turn-around time for your tax-return if the government owes you money!

The next question is what are the costs to the tax-payers of Canada to have a paper-tax filing system? Surely an online tax filing method must be cheaper than paying government employees for data-entry. What about placing the paper-forms online so everyone can file online and the data-entry step is removed!

The Canada Revenue Agency’s NETFILE system, the system used to file your taxes online, is turning 12 this year. This means we’ve been able to file our taxes online for 12 years. In this time the citizen’s of Canada have gone from 0% filing online to 56% this is a huge increase but still much lower than expected from a computer dominated world! How many more years till everyone is filing their taxes online or till the government makes it mandatory to file online?

Like it or not taxes are complex and the amount of different government programs is hard to keep track. Might as well use a tax software where you simply fill in the required boxes, it checks your return for errors and provides all the calculations accurately. With the various tax-software platforms the cost associated with the software is very competitive and can be as in-expensive as $6.

About the Author: For a full review of the

best Canadian Tax Software

visit Thor’s website

Best Tax Software



Permanent Link:

Posted: March 17th, 2018 by

No Comments | Filed under Financial Services